13-coffins,-closed-for-2,500-years,-discovered-in-egypt

13 coffins, closed for 2,500-years, discovered in Egypt

Some 13 2,500-year-old human coffins have been discovered during an excavation in Egypt.

The finds were made at the ancient site of Saqqara.

In a Facebook post, Egypt’s Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities said the coffins were found in a “deep well for burial.” The wood coffins, stacked on top of each other, were buried in the 36-foot deep “well.”

STATUES OF ANCIENT EGYPTIAN GODDESSES AND PHARAOH RAMSES II DISCOVERED

Initial indications are that the coffins haven’t been opened since they were closed 2,500-years ago. Other coffins are expected to be found in the sides of the well, according to officials. “The identity and positions of the owners of these coffins or their total number have not been identified, but these questions will be answered within the next few days through the continuation of excavations,” the Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities said in the Facebook post.

The coffins have not been opened for 2,500 years, according to archaeologists.

The coffins have not been opened for 2,500 years, according to archaeologists.
(Egypt’s Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities)

Egypt continues to reveal new aspects of its rich history. Statues of ancient Egyptian goddesses and Pharaoh Ramses II, for example, were recently uncovered near Mit Raineh, about 18 miles south of Cairo.

Earlier this year, a 3,600-year-old teenage mummy was discovered in Luxor, as well as tombs of a number of high priests.

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The coffins were discovered at the ancient site of Saqqara. (Egypt's Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities)<br />
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      The coffins were discovered at the ancient site of Saqqara. (Egypt’s Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities)<br />
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<p>Last year, an ancient fortress built by Ramses II was <a href=discovered in Beheira Governorate, northwest of Cairo, according to Egypt Today.

Fox News’ Chris Ciaccia and the Associated Press contributed to this article. Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

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